Wednesday, 24 April 2019

Found the love again

I spend a lot of time driving around in my work van, the issue was always that due to the amount of interference it caused that I could only scan channels with a CTCSS or DCS tone set. The UHF CB band was really bad but as most channel don't use CTCSS or DCS tones, it was pointless scanning them.  In the end I created a separate bank with 25 channels just for when I was driving around. Over time I stopped even using this.

Last week I got a new van for work, this has NO issues and I can again go back to scanning the bands. It is funny how this has changed my outlook on the hobby...

Close Call Hits - 24/04/2019

This morning I left my Uniden UBC126AT scanner running in "Close Call" mode in my car while driving around, below are the hits it logged.

157.9000 - BORAL (TX)
158.8375 - TOX FREE (TX)
411.1875 - FIRE UHF SIMP
476.4250 - UHF CB CH 1



Monday, 22 April 2019

Radio Desk - April 2019

With the weather here changing and winter not being far away, I am now spending more time at home scanning and searching the bands.

Due to this I have setup my monitoring equipment at home, this desk allows me to leaving my Uniden UBC126AT connected to my laptop for logging via SCAN125.




Friday, 19 April 2019

Some Of My Random Thoughts

Life is not always fair. Sometimes you get a splinter even sliding down a rainbow.

Life is one big judgment call.

Your body is a temple, but only if you treat it as one.

If your teeth are clenched and your fists are clenched, your lifespan is probably clenched.

You'll meet more angels on a winding path than on a straight one.

Walking is good for solving problems - it's like the feet are little psychiatrists.

Stress is the trash of modern life - we all generate it but if you don't dispose of it properly, it will pile up and overtake your life.

Sometimes a headache is all in your head. Relax.

If I'm trying to sleep, the ideas won't stop. If I'm trying to write, there appears a barren nothingness.

The scars you can't see are the hardest to heal.

A Non Radio Week

This week has seen me have basically no radio time.  A mix of work demands (including on boarding new staff) and home has meant it has not been possible to get any decent radio time.

I hope next week will be better...

Tuesday, 9 April 2019

DIY Micro BNC Scanning Aerial

As my radio scanning hobby has changed and the types of users I am hunting down changes, I am finding myself spending more time undertaking "up close" radio scanning. This includes both using my scanner close to my monitoring target and also unattended monitoring, using Close Call temporary store mode.

Due to this I have been looking for a very low profile aerial to use with my Uniden UBC126AT scanner. I have found the standard aerial to work fairly well but it sticks out and makes carrying the scanner much harder. 

I was in my parts box the other day and found some connectors, my idea was to build the smallest / lowest profile aerial I could which would still work well enough. As my targets are very local signals, any reduction in signal levels would not be an issue, provided it still picked up these signals.

The parts used are:
- Right angle BNC adapter
- BNC connection with a screw connector.
- A paper clip
- Some duct tape.


As can be seen in the photos below, this is about the smallest package I could build. It fits nicely on top of my Uniden UBC126AT scanner. 

Performance is better than I was expecting. On the 800MHz trunking band it works as well as the standard aerial. At UHF frequencies (what I am most interested in listening to) it is slightly down on the standard aerial. On the VHF high band and air band, it is much the same as the standard aerial. On the VHF mid band, it is much worse, given the size of the aerial, this was to be expected.







Uniden EZI30XLT Scanner - Key Press Codes

To activate these codes please press and hold the following keys as you turn on the EZI30XLT.

HOLD = Change country mode (AUS / NZ) Also enables / disables the global 2 second delay
1 + Up arrow = 88MHz search
SRVC + VOL = 136 - 136.1MHz search
SRVC + 2 = Load test frequencies MISC band
SRVC + Down arrow = 477 - 477.1MHz search
SRVC + SQ = Band signal levels (90MHz)
SRVC + 3 = 143 - 143.1MHz search
HOLD + 2 = Full reset
HOLD + Down arrow = Firmware version (1.33 / CbbbH)
VOL + Up arrow = Screen / key test. Shows all screen icons and keys as they are pressed.
2 + Up arrow = full band search 75MHz - 489MHz
Up arrow + Down Arrow = 137 - 147MHz search
Up arrow + SQ = Band signal levels. VHF High -> AIR -> FM -> UHF -> VHF Mid
Up arrow + 3 = Load test frequencies

Pauls Scanning Tips

Below is a list of radio scanning related hints and tips. Some of these are my own, others are ones that have been shared with me over the years by other scanner users.

Carrying your gear:
There are a few different ways you can carry your gear around, a lot of this depends on how much radio “stuff” you need to carry and how you use your scanner.

Some people can just throw their handheld scanner in a pocket as they walk out the door while others might need a better way to carry gear.

I personally have used many different cases and bags over the years, at one stage I had two Pelican brand hard carry cases. I have recently moved across to a much smaller hard case, this holds my UBC126AT, aerial, batteries, charger and USB cable. I also have a much larger hard ABS case which holds my whole radio collection and accessories. If this is too much of an over kill I have seen people use digital camera bags which work well as they are well padded plus they don’t draw “unwanted” attention when out in public. 

Head phones:
With the amount of people these days using iPods, iPhones and other music devices with head phones, it is possible to pick up some good headphones fairly cheap that make you blend in with other people. I have a set of white in ear headphones that look very much like iPod ones and when I wear these while walking around with my UBC126AT on my belt or in my pocket I don’t look out of place. People assume I am listening to music, I use this to my advantage.


Programming:
If you have more than one scanner / radio then try and keep them setup as close to the same as possible, for example if your handheld has bank / system 1 as the Fire Service then try and have your other radios with bank / system 1 as the fire service also, this makes things a lot easier when using different radios or trying to explain to somebody else how to use it if you’re driving or so on.


Before you start programming your scanner think about and plan what frequencies you want to program in and how you want to arrange them, some people like to group them based on service or coverage area where as others prefer in frequency order. 

My UBC126AT is programmed like this:
1 - 000 North (Fire, Ambulance, SES and common 000 frequencies)
2 – Air band / Amateur Radio
3 – UHF CB
4,5,6,7 – VHF / UHF Business band
8 - Services we don’t talk about ;)
9 - Hobart / Devonport / Burnie Frequencies
0 – Scratch bank for temporary storage or when trying to ID frequencies in use


Data management:
The more you get in to the scanning hobby the more information you need to keep track of. 

When I first started I had a sheet of paper with the 100 channels I had in my handheld.  Over the years this increased to the stage where I had a folder on my computer full of many gigabytes of radio related information.


UBCD436-PT Key Press Codes

All of these are activated by holding the below listed keys while turning the Uniden UBCD436-PT on.

2 + 9 + CHAN MOD = MEMORY CLEAR
CHAN MOD + 1 = LCD / Keypress test
CHAN MOD + 2 = LCD Contrast Adjustment
CHAN MOD + 4 = Tone Out Test
CHAN MOD + 9 = Clock Reset
SYSTEM + 1 = Close Call Test (Knob controls band)
SYSTEM + 2 = USB Serial Test
SYSTEM + 4 = Load Test Data 144MHz
SYSTEM + 5 = LCD Brightness
SYSTEM + 6 = Load Test Data 163MHz
SYSTEM + 7 = Trunking Test
SYSTEM + 8 = NWR-SAME Test
SYSTEM + 9 = Load Scan Test Data

A Short Radio Scanning Story

Paul loves the radio scanning hobby. Some people call him a nerd or a geek, but his okay with that. When you are doing something you truly enjoy, what other people think really does not matter that much.

The pain of her leaving is still raw, she said it was those bloody radio or her, he got caught out once before by choosing a woman over his hobbies. so he didn’t make that mistake again.

“21 to base, do we have an address for this delivery?”

He sits in his chair, at his radio desk. His beloved Uniden UBCD396XT is running in search mode. 780XLT scanning the TASGRN sites and some other frequencies. He is checking the ACMA database for new frequencies, adding them to a config file. 

“Firecom, this is Launceston 1.1 responding to a DBA at Kmart Launceston, SO Grant on board”

His friends, what few are left don’t care for his hobby, every time he talks about it they switch off, it seems everybody does. His hobbies and his work are what keeps him going.

The last sun of the day is fading, soon he will call it a night. While people will come and go, if he stays true to himself and follows his heart he will never feel that way again, the day she packed up and left him.

About Me

I have been involved in the radio hobby for over 20 years, this has included:
Radio Scanning
Amateur Radio
Shortwave Radio
Ultralight Radio DXing
UHF CB

My sole focus is now radio scanning, mostly hunting down new users / frequencies and confirming usage and details.

I am happily married and have two small children, I work in the IT support field as an IT Manager. This includes managing the day to day operational needs of a wide range of clients across the state. Leading a small team of IT professionals to provide exceptional service and support in everything we do.

About This Blog

Launceston Analytical Radio Scanning is my blog for my hobby of analytical radio scanning. This can be best described as "The use of analytical processes, procedures, equipment and software to construct fully detailed and researched information which outlines the overall usage of a given radio frequency, channel, system or user”.

My interest in analytical radio scanning has come about due to my passion for finding out as much as possible about different radios system, who uses them, frequencies, call signs, codes and other parameters that help to build up an overall picture of the system. While I am an active member of a few different radio related groups, forums and websites on which I share some of my research, this blog is designed for me to expand on this in the future and share a much wider range of information. Analytical radio scanning is at the core of everything I do with this blog and the radio scanning hobby in general.

One thing I am always doing is searching the various radio bands for new / unpublished frequencies and users which is very rewarding when you manage to confirm who is using a frequency, in some cases this has taken me in excess of 10 years to confirm who is using a given frequency and in one case 5 seconds of audio was what finally confirmed who they were. This is why I find this type of activity so rewarding. Please note I do this as a hobby and I don’t get paid for it or make any money off it, the enjoyment and knowledge I gain is more than enough reward for the hours I spend doing this. 

Please also note that I have no interest in listening to the Tasmania Police Service or any equipment capable of receiving their transmissions.


Monday, 8 April 2019

Article – Guide to Radio Scanning in Launceston Tasmania. – Updated: April 2019.

A few times of late I have had people contact me asking for some "starter" frequencies for Launceston area. I have now written a bit of a "Guide to Radio Scanning in Launceston Tasmania". This covers not just frequencies but also some background information on them and advice on suitable equipment. Please note that you can’t listen to the Tasmania police in Launceston as they use an 800MHz EDACS trunking radio network with Provoice talk groups.

What is radio scanning?
Radio scanning is a hobby which is enjoyed by people all across Australian and the world. Radio scanners are special radios that receive signals not audible on normal AM/FM radios like you might have in your home or car. Various groups make use of two way radios; these include the 000 services such as ambulances, police and fire services. Business users such as buses, trucks and security companies, aircraft, trains, boats, amateur radio operators and CB radio can all be heard on a radio scanner.
Interest in radio scanning in Australian has dropped off over the past decade in general, as most of the 000 services and some business users have migrated to “secure” forms of two way radio communications which cannot be received on any radio scanner. This has seen scanning appeal less to the casual listener, these days most people with an interest in radio scanning are now approaching this hobby from a technical point of view where searching the bands for new signals, data logging / decoding and other more technical interests have taken over from listening to the 000 services which used to be the main reason most people had a radio scanner.

Contrary to some widespread beliefs and misinformation, radio scanning is perfectly legal in Australia unless you are listening to communications carried over the public telephone network. This includes mobile phones, cordless phones, sea phones and any phone patch interconnects which some commercial two way radio users may have.  Some common sense around radio scanning is to not repeat what you hear to any third parties and not to use what you hear for commercial gain or illegal purposes.

Equipment:
Depending on what you wish to listen to, radio scanners can be purchased new for less than $150 all the way up to $1000 or more. Second hand radio scanners can be found for around half these prices, however a word of caution. Not all radio scanners (especially those sold on the second hand market) cover all the required frequency bands. To get the most benefit, a radio scanner for use in Tasmania needs to cover at least these frequency bands.
66-88MHz
137-174MHz
406-512MHz

Why can’t I hear some frequencies?
This could be for a number of reasons. Some radio users have switched to digital modes, these require very expensive and complex radio scanners or the use of a computer with decoding software.

Your location and the location of the transmitter plus the frequency band in use also play a huge part in what frequencies you can hear. Generally the lower the frequency, the better coverage it will provide (in open areas). This is why for example the Tasmania Fire Service use frequencies in the 78/79MHz band with high mountain top repeaters for wide area coverage. On the other hand, Launceston College staff use a UHF frequency of 492.600MHz which provides coverage around the CBD and city area. At higher frequencies the radios (especially handhelds) are generally smaller and have smaller aerials which makes carrying them much easier.

Frequencies:
I personally have over 350 frequencies programmed in my scanners, these cover a wide range of users and some get very little use. From this large list I have broken them down in to a list of the most active / interesting frequencies for the Launceston area, sorted by group, I have done this so that you can only program those frequencies which you are interested in.

000 Services
78.62500 - AMBO-MT BARROW (Ambulance Tasmania frequency for Mt Barrow, covers the North well, carries the same traffic as the West Launceston frequency)
78.65000 - FIRE-TAMAR (TFS frequency for West Tamar area)
79.03750 - FIRE-WEST LTON (TFS frequency for Launceston area)
79.06250 - AMBO-WEST LTON (Ambulance Tasmania frequency for West Launceston, covers the Launceston area well, carries the same traffic as the Mt Barrow frequency)
79.56250 - FIRE-NE (TFS frequency for North East Tasmania)
79.66250 - FIRE-NE (TFS frequency for North East Tasmania)

Air band
118.70000 - TOWER-LTON (Launceston tower frequency)
123.80000 - FIA-NORTH (High level aircraft frequency)
129.50000 - QANTAS (VHF company frequency)
130.12500 - JETSTAR-HOBART (VHF company frequency)
130.22500 - JETSTAR-LTON (VHF company frequency)
130.35000 - VIRGIN BLUE (VHF company frequency)

Amateur Radio
147.00000 - VK7RAA-MTARTHUR
438.55000 - VK7RAB-MTARTHUR
439.77500 - VK7RDR-DAZZLER RANGE

UHF CB
476.45000 - UHF CB CHANNEL 02 (Mt Arthur repeater)
476.85000 - UHF CB CHANNEL 18 (LTON TIP)
477.40000 - UHF CB CHANNEL 40 (Road / truck driver channel)

Business Radio Users
70.3250 - ABILITY TAXIS (Used by a maxi taxi company, very active at times)
72.2750 - LES WALKDEN
78.0125 - WTC WORKS (West Tamar Council works frequency)
78.2875 - LCC-MTARTHUR (Launceston City Council works frequency, suburb and rural areas)
78.3125 - LCC-FREELANDS (Launceston City Council works frequency, CBD / city areas)
78.4750 - FORESTRY TAS (Mt Arthur)
79.4750 - FORESTRY TAS (Dazzler Range)
162.4750 – BORAL (Dazzler Range)
162.5000 – BORAL (Mt Arthur)
162.6125 - TASRAIL-MTARTHUR (TASRAIL frequency, covers North East area)
163.05000 - REDLINE BUSES (Redline bus frequency. Used for airport pickups and carries state wide traffic)
163.43750 - TOX FREE (Waste company, very active early morning)
462.1000 - OFFICEWORKS
462.2500 - KMART LAUNCESTON
463.4000 - TARGET LAUNCESTON
464.37500 - METRO-FREELANDS (metro buses frequency for greater Launceston area, very active at times)
467.17500 - TECS (Rental frequency, used by a delivery/ bus company)
473.50000 - TASRAIL SIMP UHF (TASRAIL UHF shunt channel)
485.25000 - MARCOM WATSON (Rental frequency. Used by Sainty Coaches / bulk goods delivery)
488.55000 - MARCOM WATSON (Rental frequency. Used by delivery company.
492.60000 - LTON COLLEGE (Launceston college cleaning / support staff. Mostly active of a morning and late afternoon.)
494.92500 - LCC SWIMMING (Launceston City Council. Used at Launceston swimming centre. Mostly active during the summer months and of a weekend)

Scanning Repeater Input Frequencies - Why would you do it?

In almost all cases, you should program your scanner with the output frequency of a repeater. Since this is the frequency that the repeater is using to rebroadcast all communications and as repeaters with an antenna mounted high up will have much better line of sight to mobiles and portables and cover a much larger area.

When using Close Call mode, you will mostly get hits on the input frequencies of repeaters. This I have found useful for both finding new frequencies in use and also with confirming the user of frequencies, especially on shared repeaters where multiple users are sharing the same frequency but with different CTCSS tones.

As I focus more on traffic analysis (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_analysis) the content of the message becomes less important than when, where, why and who is using a given frequency. What I have done in the past few weeks is to take a group of the more active frequencies in the Launceston area and program the input frequencies in as below.

72.82500 - ABILITY (TX)
80.15000 - TECS (TX)
80.78570 - LCC (TX)
80.81250 - LCC (TX)
81.53750 - TFS (TX)
81.56250 - AMBO (TX)
157.90000 - BORAL (TX)
158.01250 - TASRAIL (TX)
158.45000 - REDLINE (TX)
158.83750 - TOXFREE (TX)
454.27500 - METRO (TX)
479.42500 - LCC QVM (TX)
479.57500 - LCC PARK (TX)
480.05000 - MARCOMNET (TX)
483.35000 - MARCOMNET (TX)

This limits the radio traffic to only what is physically close to my location. So far my results have been encouraging, a number of times I have been able to visually match what I see (such as trucks from a company who use a shared repeater) with radio traffic on the input frequencies and the matching CTCSS tones.

Over time I will continue to log these results and share them on here.

Sunday, 7 April 2019

Close Call Loggings - 7/4/2019

-------------------------
**FreqLogITx - Report**
Report Date: 04/07/2019
Report Time: 20:32:56


Freq / Name: 453.025 - LCC QVMAG (DMR) (TX)
Date / Site: 04/2019  
                                                                                                                                                                                      
Freq / Name: 462.250 - KMART
Date / Site: 04/2019                                         
                                                                                                       
Freq / Name: 463.025 - LCC QVMAG (DMR)
Date / Site: 04/2019

Saturday, 6 April 2019

New Radio User - BCF Launceston

This week I have managed to log and confirm a new radio user in Launceston, the details are below.

Freq / Name: 462.4125 - BCF Launceston
Date / Site: 04/2019 - Launceston CBD                                          
Notes: CTCSS Logged 

Monday, 1 April 2019

Fitting the radio hobby in to your life

First let me say that I don’t think I have this perfect (yet) but I am doing much better in the past few months at fitting in the radio hobby to the rest of my life. Below are some hints and tips I have used to make this work.

- Always have a radio close by:
Many times, I have come across “interesting” events but have missed out on a good monitoring opportunity due to not having my scanner with me, I now make a point of always having it close by, even if this is just in the car.


- Be Prepared:
I always have a charged set of batteries ready to go and my scanner programmed. If I am heading to a different area to where I normally am, I make sure I have the frequencies for that area programmed too, before I leave.


- Plan:
If I know we are going for a walk (we often walk to our local shopping area or in to the city and bus home) I put my scanner in my backpack in close call auto store mode. I can then enjoy the time out walking with my family, knowing I am also logging any interesting local radio traffic for later analysis and review. 


- Take any monitoring opportunities:
Shows, sporting or community events or even just walking around the city can all bring interesting radio traffic. Always make the most of these, even if it means doing some research or planning beforehand. It is better to spend a few minutes setting your radio up and then going to an event then trying to do it once you are inside or not doing it at all and missing interesting traffic.


- Make use of unattended features:
Often, I leave my scanners running using unattended features such as close call temporary / auto store or search and store while I am at work. These allow me to focus on my work or family time. If your scanner is PC controllable look in to using it with software for logging traffic for later review.


- Review your logs regularly:
This is something I have struggled with in the past, I would often have my scanners logging but not check the logs for weeks, by then any logged frequencies might not be in use or a good catch might be missed due to the large amount of data to be reviewed.


- Keep your radio collection tidy:
I am in the process of sorting and rebuilding my radio scanner collection. I have recently set up a new set of shelves which are perfect for having these all set up but also keep them tidy.


- Have some monitoring free time:
No matter how much you enjoy the radio hobby, try and have some quality time with your family, not everybody shares your passion for radio.

Sunday, 31 March 2019

Up Close Radio Scanning

Over the past few years, a number of the more active two way radio users in the Launceston area have gone off the air, in most cases they have either moved to MDT type devices, mobile phones or no longer use radio communications at all. These include some taxi companies, RACT roadside vans and some delivery companies. While these might not have been everybody’s preferred monitoring targets, they were active a lot of the time and had wide coverage areas from their hill top high power repeaters, making hearing them very easy.

In the past couple of years a number of businesses have started using ear piece communication devices in the UHF band, these are very interesting to listen to but due to the low power they use you need to be very close to be able to hear them, this calls for some up close radio scanning. Below are some examples of the methods I have used to be able to monitor these signals in a “low profile” way. In all these cases I have based this around using my UBCD436PT which is a larger size handheld, if you have a smaller handheld radio then this is even easier. Back when mobiles phones were much larger (bricks) it was easier to pass off a radio scanner as something else, these days that just would not work.

My daily carry radio kit (UBCD436PT, aerials, cables and so on) is based on a $1 Kmart lunch box, which I have published the details of it here on my blog.  I choose this so as not to draw any unwanted attention to myself or the contents of the lunchbox. It does not scream “expensive stuff inside” and blends in. I take the view that it is better to be discrete with my scanner listening hobby, especially within the view of the public. It does nobody no harm but it is best to draw attention to our innocent activities, which can be easily misunderstood. For this reason I prefer a set and forget type of setup, this means I can’t listen at the time but with using the UBCD436PT’s recorder feature I can later review what it finds. This also helps with blending in.

Please note: None of this is written to encourage you to attempt to take a banned item in to anywhere, simply as a way to enjoy the radio scanning hobby in a low profile way.


Radio in my vest: This works best in winter (wearing a heavy vest like this is summer makes you stand out, exactly the opposite of what we want to do). Before you reach your intended monitoring target, turn the volume all the way down and slip your radio in close call mode / with the recorder feature enabled in to a secure pocket, walk around the target area as normal, knowing your radio is logging all the traffic it hears for later review. I have used this method a few times in the CBD area with good results. If possible, enabled the keypad lock so that you don’t accidently press a key and end up with nothing logged.

In my backpack: As the next step up from having the radio in your vest pocket, in this case before you reach your intended monitoring target, turn the volume all the way down and place your radio in close call mode / with the recorder feature enabled back in to a non-descript / low profile case and then place this in your backpack. This works well in the warmer months when wearing a vest would not be practical or if you are going to be walking around for a longer period of time. If you are careful you can also use the cover of your backpack to check any loggings by keeping the radio hidden in the case. A disadvantage of this method is that some shops do check bags and it can also increase the chances of somebody trying to steal your bag.

Under the pram:
Really trying to blend in? In this case before you reach your intended monitoring target, turn the volume all the way down and place your radio in close call mode / with the recorder feature enabled back in to a non-descript / low profile case (such as my lunch box case) and then place this under a pram. Trying to do this with an empty pram is not a good idea and I don’t recommend stealing children for this purpose, I am lucky I have my own. Add a nappy bag or a lunch box with food (just don’t get mixed up and give a toddler the one with your expensive radio in) and you can walk around, knowing all radio traffic is being logged and recorded for later review. Very few places check prams and even if they do, they won’t normally check inside a lunch box.A mix of all of the above methods has allowed me to confirm a number of UHF headset frequencies and also log various other low power / limited coverage radio systems for later review.

Scanning the Tasmanian Police Radio System

*** Of late I have been receiving more messages about this ***

- The Tasmania Police use a EDACS trunked radio system, this operates in the 800MHz band.
- It runs both analogue talk groups and Provoice.
- Uniden now sell a number of scanners which support Provoice, these require a paid upgrade and the total cost for these scanners and the paid upgrade exceeds $850. 

I have NO interest in scanning the Tasmania Police radio system or radios capable of receiving their communications.

The Tasmanian government have a tender open for a replacement of this radio system, what this will cover and how much will be encrypted is unknown at this stage.

Monthly Loggings - March 2019

-------------------------
**FreqLogITx - Report**
Report Date: 03/31/2019
Report Time: 20:30:38


      Freq / Name: 070.325 - Ability Taxis
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Abels Hill  

                            
      Freq / Name: 072.125 - Connorville
      Date / Site: 03/2019       

                                    
      Freq / Name: 072.275 - Les Walkden
      Date / Site: 03/2019  - Mt Arthur      

                        
      Freq / Name: 072.825 - Ability Taxis (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019               

                            
      Freq / Name: 073.130 - B W Manions
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Simplex  

                               
      Freq / Name: 078.3125 - LCC WORKS
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Freelands Lookout  

                     
      Freq / Name: 078.625 - AMBO
      Date / Site: 21/03/2019           

                             
      Freq / Name: 078.650 - TFS Tamar
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Arthur   

                            
      Freq / Name: 078.775 - AMBO
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Millers Bluff       

                    
      Freq / Name: 078.825 - AMBO
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Dazzler Range      

                     
      Freq / Name: 079.0375 - TFS Urban
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - West Launceston       

                  
      Freq / Name: 079.0625 - AMBO
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - West Launceston             

            
      Freq / Name: 079.600 - TFS

      Date / Site: 03/2019  
                                         
      Freq / Name: 080.7875 - LCC (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          

      Freq / Name: 080.8125 - LCC (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019       
                                    
      Freq / Name: 081.5375 - TFS URBAN (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019     

                                      
      Freq / Name: 081.5625 - AMBO (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019          

                                 
      Freq / Name: 118.100 - Hobart Tower
      Date / Site: 03/2019        

                                   
      Freq / Name: 118.700 - Launceston Tower
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Barrow / Launceston Airport     

     
      Freq / Name: 120.700 - FIA / Devonport
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 122.600 - FIA Wynyard
      Date / Site: 03/2019               

                            
      Freq / Name: 123.800 - ATC North
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Barrow              

                 
      Freq / Name: 123.950 - FIA/NW
      Date / Site: 03/2019                    

                       
      Freq / Name: 126.500 - ATC Launceston
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Barrow        

                       
      Freq / Name: 126.700 - CTAF
      Date / Site: 03/2019      

                                     
      Freq / Name: 126.900 - CTAF North West
      Date / Site: 03/2019      

                                     
      Freq / Name: 129.500 - QANTAS
      Date / Site: 03/2019            

                               
      Freq / Name: 130.125 - Jetstar Hobart
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Launceston Airport  

                    
      Freq / Name: 130.225 - Jetstar Launceston
      Date / Site: 03/2019                            

               
      Freq / Name: 130.350 - Virgin Australia
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                 

          
      Freq / Name: 145.025 - 2M Ham Simplex
      Date / Site: 03/2019          

                                 
      Freq / Name: 145.175 - 2M Ham APRS
      Date / Site: 03/2019           

                                
      Freq / Name: 146.400 - VK7RAA 2M (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019    

                                       
      Freq / Name: 147.000 - VK7RAA 2M
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Arthur     

                          
      Freq / Name: 156.375 - Marine
      Date / Site: 03/2019                      

                     
      Freq / Name: 156.400 - Marine 8
      Date / Site: 03/2019        

                                   
      Freq / Name: 156.425 - Marine Weather
      Date / Site: 03/2019             

                              
      Freq / Name: 156.700 - Marine 14
      Date / Site: 03/2019        

                                   
      Freq / Name: 156.800 - Marine 16
      Date / Site: 03/2019     

                                      
      Freq / Name: 157.575 - TASRAIL Simplex VHF
      Date / Site: 03/2019            

                               
      Freq / Name: 157.900 - BORAL (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019      

                                     
      Freq / Name: 158.000 - TASRAIL
      Date / Site: 03/2019       

                                    
      Freq / Name: 158.8375 - TOX FREE  (Input)
      Date / Site: 03/2019    

                                       
      Freq / Name: 161.075 - ARTEC      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          

      Freq / Name: 162.375 - TASRAIL
      Date / Site: 03/2019   - Millers Bluff                        


      Freq / Name: 162.475 - Boral
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Dazzler Range                          


      Freq / Name: 162.500 - Boral
      Date / Site: 03/2019  - Mt Arthur                             


      Freq / Name: 162.600 - TASRAIL
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Dazzler Range                          


      Freq / Name: 162.6125 - TASRAIL
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Arthur                              


      Freq / Name: 162.6625 - TASRAIL
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Snow Hill                              


      Freq / Name: 163.050 - Redline      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Abels Hill                             

      Freq / Name: 163.4375 - ToxFree
      Date / Site: 03/2019  - Abels Hill                            


      Freq / Name: 164.300 - Redline
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Dazzler Range                          


      Freq / Name: 411.1875 - TFS UHF
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 411.6125 - TFS UHF Simplex
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 412.3625 - TFS UHF
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 413.425 - AMBO UHF Simplex
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 413.700 - AMBO UHF Link
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 415.4875 - TFS UHF Simplex
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 438.4125 - VK7RJG (DMR)
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 438.550 - VK7RJG
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Arthur                              


      Freq / Name: 439.775 - VK7RDR
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Dazzler Range                          


      Freq / Name: 450.275 - JB HiFi Launceston
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Launceston                             


      Freq / Name: 450.275 - JB HiFi Launceston
      Date / Site: 20/03/2019                                       


      Freq / Name: 454.275 - Metro (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 463.400 - Target Launceston
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 464.275 - Metro
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Abels Hill                             


      Freq / Name: 464.375 - Metro
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Freelands Lookout                      


      Freq / Name: 465.400 - MARCOM WATSON
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Mt Arthur                              


      Freq / Name: 467.175 - TECS
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 471.700 - Pfrifer Cranes
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 473.500 - TASRAIL UHF Simplex
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 474.375 - LCC Parking (DMR)
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 474.850 - Transport Inspectors
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 475.05625 - Tas Racing
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 483.350 - Marcom Watsom (TX)
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 484.800 - BOAGS
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 484.800 - BOAGS
      Date / Site: 20/03/2019                                       


      Freq / Name: 485.250 - Marcom Watson
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 488.550 - TECS
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 488.550 - TECS
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          


      Freq / Name: 492.600 - Launceston College
      Date / Site: 03/2019 - Launceston CBD                         


      Freq / Name: 494.925 - LCC Swimming Centre
      Date / Site: 03/2019                                          
}, 10);